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From Covington's History of Colquitt County (pp. 85-88):

A Notable Wedding
The courthouse of Colquitt County was destroyed by fire in 1881, with practically all the records kept therein. However, in a small black book in the present ordinary's office may be found a record showing that on the 14th day of October, 1873, Henry Gay, ordinary of Colquitt County, issued a marriage license to James T. Norman and Susan Jane Tucker. This license was returned into that office with a showing at the bottom that the ceremony was performed on the 23rd day of October, 1873.
Susan Jane Tucker was the oldest child of John Tucker, oldest son of Elder Crawford Tucker, already referred to in this book, and his wife Susan A. Stevenson. This same Susan A. S. Tucker was one of the notable women of Colquitt County, as demonstrated by the character of children that she turned into the body of the citizenship, numbering ten. We shall meet her further on in this book.
The father of the bride was a conspicuous leader in Colquitt, in 1873. He was the son of Elder Crawford Tucker, Colquitt County pioneer and patriarch. He was the owner of forty-three lots of Colquitt County land, each containing 490 acres, more or less; and his holdings of live stock were of greater value than his lands. He served as Colquitt's representative in the General Assembly of Georgia, at the sessions of 1873-4. He was accordingly the most important man in Colquitt County; and he was “feeling his oats.”
James T. Norman, the bridegroom, known by his intimates as “Sonny,” was the oldest son of Jeremiah Bryant Norman, who was one of the seven sons of James Mitchell Norman and Ruth Tillman Norman, who came to Colquitt County about [p. 85/p. 86] the same time that Elder Tucker arrived. J. B. Norman, Sr., was himself the owner of much land and live stock; was politically inclined, and was going to represent Colquitt in the House of Representatives of Georgia more than once before his death.
For all these reasons, John Tucker decided to give Susan Jane a wedding that would set up an all-time record in Colquitt.
There were no such things as engraved invitations, innocent of initials, and spelling out each name in full; but messengers on horseback carried a most cordial invitation by word of mouth to every family in Colquitt to come to Susan Jane's wedding.
And, according to all accounts, they responded to the invitation, from Little River to the Mitchell County line, and from the Worth boundary straight south to Thomas. They came in families, the busy housewife bringing along her “numerous brood,” and grandma with her snuff. Twelve hundred guests, according to the stories related to us in the present year, by Messrs. J. A. Owens, Dan J. Strickland, Henry Monk and Linton Hancock, all of whom are now octogenarians, and all of whom were guests.
And from these “Merrie gentlemen” comes a fairly unanimous account of whole carcasses, selected from the flocks and herds of John Tucker, barbecued to a turn, and served with all the “trimmin's.” And every one of them, when the subject is mentioned, will immediately speak of coffee cooking in the yard in a 90-gallon syrup kettle, and chicken pilau a-simmering away in another kettle of the same capacity.
The opening rite of weddings, in those old days, was the “charge,” a term applied to the procession of horseback riders made up of the unmarried men friends of the contracting [p. 86/p. 87] parties. This procession rode two abreast, and was headed by the bridegroom, who was flanked on his right by his mounted “waiter,” and on the left, by his “torchbearer.” Such procession was accustomed to gallop about sundown in middle gear, down the road, straight by the home of the bride, and after getting a mile or so beyond it, they would stop, turn the procession around, and return to her home, in a walk, reaching which, they would stop, and friendly hands connected with the bride's establishment, would take charge of the mounts of the groom and his attendants, and tie them up, while all the other members of the procession would perform that office for themselves. In the meantime, the groom and his flankers, as their mounts were taken away, would go immediately into the yard, and pass through the front door in to the “front room,” where they would find the bride sitting, and sitting by her her own “waiter” and “torchbearer.” There would be plenty of merry talking, of course. The groom and his attendants taking seats by the bride and hers, while torches were being lighted for the “torchbearers.” The bride and the groom would then go out into the yard; the waiters would come next, and last would come the “torchbearers.” Since there were no electric lights in those days, and since marriages were usually performed at “early candlelight,” and since every one present on the whole premises wanted to see the ceremony, and “how the bride looked” on such occasions, the “torchbearers” were a necessary adjunct. We can find several surviving guests, including the ones already listed, who will say that “Sonny's charge had at least seventy-five young couples in it, and both horses and riders made a very brave show indeed.”
After the wedding ceremony, the immense feast, prepared for this wedding by the Tuckers was served to the hundreds of guests, the hospitable suggestion made by the host being, “Eat till you bust.” [p. 87/p. 88]
As has been said, the ordinary lighting by tallow candles was quite insufficient for such great gathering; and so a scaffold was generally erected in front of the house, and on it was spread a good covering of dirt, upon which a big pile of fat “lightwood” was kept blazing, this furnishing abundant light for the dance by the young folks, which invariably followed the close of the wedding rites. And the aforenamed surviving guests assure us that, in relays, the young folks fiddled and danced at Susan Jane's wedding all night long, and
“When music arose, with its voluptuous swell,
Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again,
And all went merry as a marriage bell.”
This is written in August, 1936, and so it will soon have been sixty-three years since “Sonny” and Susan Jane got married. Some of our readers will want to know how their marriage turned out. And so, it is a pleasure to say that, by the united testimony of a whole country-side, this couple were ideally happy, every moment of their married life, till “Sonny's” death in 1896, leaving Susan Jane to carry on alone in the rearing of their eleven children. How well she succeeded will be shown in a separate chapter herein, entitled “Noted Colquitt County Women,” and for the present, we close the account of the pastoral romance of “Sonny” and Susan Jane by expressing the hope that our unmarried readers may find as much happiness in their marriages as the hero and heroine of this story did in theirs.
 
Family: F2866
 
2
From Covington's History of Colquitt County (p. 64):
As Miles Monk, Sr., was standing to be married, in a Colquitt County yard, in the middle 1860's, a young fawn ran out of the surrounding woods, and stopped between his legs. So goes the tradition, and the accounts of surviving witnesses.
 
Family: F1881
 
3 "Family tradition says that Samuel King, whom Elizabeth came to marry as her second husband, was the overseer on her plantation in Virginia after Matthew [Davenport] died." Family: F2258
 
4        Invitation: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Boyd Ross request the honour of your presence at the marriage of their daughter Laura Camilla to Mr. Herbert Clarence Norris on Saturday afternoon, June the twelfth at four o’clock Mount Berry Chapel, Mount Berry, Georgia.
       Card: Reception immediately after the ceremony, 1101 North Fifth Avenue, Rome, Georgia.
 
Family: F423
 
5 (five children) Family: F124
 
6 13 children Family: F3070
 
7 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F135
 
8 Cavender-Ross Wedding
       Miss Barbara Faye Cavender became the bride of Mr. Charles D. Ross at the Baptist Parsonage at seven o’clock in the evening February the 24th. Rev. Herbert Brown read the double-ring ceremony with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Cavender and Mr. O. M. Cavender as witnesses.
       The bride was attired in a street-length dress of turquoise blue with black accessories and orchid corsage.
       Mrs. Ross is the daughter of Mr. O. M. Cavender and the late Mrs. Cavender. She is a graduate of the Clayton High School.
       Mr. Ross is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Ross of Miami, Florida, and a graduate of Tech High School, Atlanta, Georgia. He is employed at the Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company.
       They are making their home at 202-1/2 Monroe Street. 
Family: F160
 
9 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F125
 
10 Miss Ellen Olivia Trammell Is Melvin Mathis’s Bride
       The North Rome Methodist Church was the setting at 5 yesterday afternoon for the marriage of Miss Ellen Olivia Trammell, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Trammell, and Melvin Mathis, whose parents are Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Mathis. The Rev. Jack W. Lamb read the two-ring ceremony.
       Pat Trammell, Fred Mathis, Harold Gresham and Jimmy Mathis, ushers, seated guests while Miss Virginia Shiflett, organist, and Everett Porter Jr, vocalist, presented a program of music. Mr. Porter sang “Always” and “At the End of a Perfect Day.”
       The front of the church was canopied in greenery and in the foreground were baskets of white gladioli; and many mounted white candles were burning when the couple took their marital vows.
       Miss Nancy Ross, cousin of the bride, was her maid of honor, and another cousin was bridesmaid Miss Angela Kokal, of Marietta, and Connie Trammell, junior maid and Carol Trammell, young sister of the bride, her flower girl.
       The bride’s attendants wore lovely dresses, cocktail length, of nylon net over matching taffeta. The maid of honor chose cashmere blue; the bridesmaid mint green; the junior maid dawn pink and the pretty flower girl white with a wide blue sash which tied in a big bow. The attendants’ dresses were styled exactly alike. They carried fan-shaped bouquets of asters in pastel tints, with matching ties.
       As the bride and her father came down a central church aisle, the bridegroom and his best man, Gene Mathis, stood before the greenery banked altar.
Bridal gown organdy
       The bride was lovely in her summer wedding gown of snow white imported organza made over white taffeta. Ruffles cascading in the back extended into a train. The fitted bodice was of chantilly lace made over taffeta. The sleeves of lace were elbow length and her veil of bridal illusion fell from a Juliet cap encrusted with pearls. She carried a prayer book marked with a white orchid.
Lovely reception
       Before Mr. Mathis and his bride left to spend their honeymoon at an unannounced destination, they were guests of honor at a reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Anthony, aunt and uncle of the bride, on Turner Chapel Road.
       Rooms were adorned with arrangements of gladioli in pastel tints and many white blossoms.
       A cloth of white damask covered the bride’s table and the three-tiered wedding cake was topped with miniature figures of bride and bridegroom. Punch and the wedding cake were served and bridal mints and nuts filled silver and crystal compotes.
       Mrs. R. C. Jones Jr, of Clearwater, Fla., a cousin of the bride, registered guests in the bride’s book.
       Mrs. Trammell, the bride’s mother, wore a dress of pink lace posed over matching pink taffeta and her accessories navy blue; her shoulder spray white roses; Mrs. Mathis, mother of the bridegroom, wore a silk shantung model combining navy and white and her accessories were navy. She wore pink rosebuds.
       Mrs. Mathis, the bride, when she left to spend her honeymoon at an unannounced destination, wore her bridal orchid pinned to her dress of slate grey glazed cotton and her accessories were white.
       On their return, Mr. and Mrs. Mathis will be at home in an apartment in the Perry, on East Third Street.
       Among those coming from out of town to the wedding were: Mrs. Mable Barre, of Beaumont, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Jones Jr, of Clearwater, Florida; Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Green, of Athens; Miss Julia Wooten, Mr. and Mrs. “Buddy” Butler, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Avery, Mrs. Lelia Trammell, of Atlanta; Mr. and Mrs. August Kokal, of Marietta, and Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Trammell, of Dalton. 
Family: F157
 
11 Miss Sarah Ross Plights Troth to August Kokal At Trinity
       Miss Sarah Vance Ross, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Ross, and August Kokal, of Mount Berry, formerly of West Blocton, Alabama, were married Saturday morning at 8 o’clock at Trinity Methodist Church, the pastor, the Rev. J. W. Segars, officiating, reading an impressive ring ceremony.
       Mrs. Hugh McCrary, church pianist, played among other numbers “To a Wild Rose” and the bridal music from Wagner’s Lohengrin. Miss Aleen Rush sang with unusual sweetness “I Love You Truly.”
       The bride’s only attendant was Miss Elizabeth Powers. She wore a lovely model of figured chiffon in Valencia blue and red. She wore a red hat untrimmed except for narrow ribbon and her flowers were gardenias, fashioned in a shoulder bouquet.
       The bride was lovely wearing a beautiful gown of navy chiffon embroidered in effective pattern in rose pink. The embroidery was used on sleeves and the distinctive collar forming the front of the bodice. She wore a wide brimmed navy blue hat and her gloves and other accessories were navy. She wore lilies-of-the-valley and pink rosebuds in a shoulder bouquet.
       Carlton Blankenship served as Mr. Kokal’s best man.
       The bride’s brothers, Lewis and Lamar Ross, served as ushers. Guests included the families and a few friends.
       The wedding party left the church to the strains of Mendelssohn’s march played by Mrs. McCrary.
       After a wedding trip Mr. and Mrs. Kokal will be at home in Frances cottage on Berry school campus. Mr. Kokal, a graduate of the schools and who has a degree from Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Kokal, of Blocton, Ala. He is a member of the Industrial Arts faculty at the school.
       The bride prepared for college at Berry schools, later graduating from Georgia State College of Women, at Milledgeville.
       Her many pleasing qualities and fine traits of character have made her popular with acquaintances and friends. She is a member of a large interesting family. 
Family: F143
 
12 Mrs. Bessie Ross, Harry Dunlop Are Married Saturday
       Mrs. Bessie Jones Ross, of 310 East Fifth Avenue, and Harry Dunlop, of Youngstown, Ohio, originally from Cullybackey, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, were married Saturday night at 8 o’clock at the First Methodist Church. The Rev. Harry Lee Smith officiated.
       The altar was decorated with greenery, and Mrs. Nell Wilkinson provided background music.
       Mrs. R. C. Jones Jr, of Clearwater, Florida, was her mother’s matron of honor. She wore a rose and white floral print featuring a rose cummerbund, and a white velvet and net cap. Her flowers were pink roses and white stephanotis. Robert Gordon McKee was Mr. Dunlop’s best man.
       Mrs. Dunlop wore for her marriage a champagne Chantilly lace dress, waltz-length, and a small matching hat. Her corsage was a white orchid with yellow throat.
       Following the ceremony Mrs. Dunlop’s brothers and sisters entertained with a reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Vick on Charlton Road. Other hosts were Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Jones, of Atlanta; Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gossett, of Greenville, South Carolina, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Jones of Griffin, Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. J. I. Jones, of Rome.
       The living room was decorated with arrangements of white gladioli, gardenias and magnolia blossoms.
       The dining table was covered with a white lace cloth over pink satin. The wedding cake was at one end and the punch bowl occupied the other end of the table. The centerpiece was a five-branched silver candelabrum holding shell pink candles. Pink flowers were used in an arrangement on the buffet. A variety of sandwiches, nuts and mints were served with the cake. Coffee was served on the patio.
       For a brief wedding trip south Mrs. Dunlop wore a brown silk suit, bone accessories and her bridal orchid.
       The couple will reside at 5105 West Boulevard, Youngstown, Ohio, after July 1.
       Mrs. Dunlop was complimented with a number of parties prior to her marriage.  
Family: F2415
 
13 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F152
 
14 An infant of David and Allie also is buried at Damascas. The grave has no date or name. Family: F2621
 
15 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F442
 
16 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F2471
 
17 Nicholas Boone was born in Germany. (He had to be "naturalized" in 1765.) Various documents (e.g., Abraham Boone's will) refer to Nicholas as the half-brother of the other Boone boys. Since Johann married Anna Maria fairly soon after his 1741 arrival on the Marlborough, it is speculated that Johann's first wife--Nicholas's mother--may have died in Germany, so that Johann was a widower with one young son when he arrived in Philadelphia. Family: F395
 
18 Robert Washington (born 26 September 1847, died 19 September 1941) married 1st Mary A. Eliza Brantley (born 28 February 1850, died 18 May 1882). He was a farmer, owned a cotton gin and small store on his property which was a part of the Isaac Smith estate. Their six children: (1) George C. (1870-1943) married 1890 Vianna Waters (1880-1953). (2) Lewis L. 1872-1966 married 1st Leila Teressa Jones (1874-1907); married 2nd Lena Corilla Jones (1884-1975). (3) Mary Lucy (1875-1914) married W.A. Wommack 1893. (4) Thomas (1877-1956). (5) Elizabeth (1850-1882). (6) Rebecca (1879-1981) married Thomas J. Swint, Sr. (1875-1941). He was ordinary of Washington County 18 years.
-----Robert Washington married 2nd Mary Adilene Batchelor (born 19 February 1867, died 27 November 1943), married 22 February 1885. With this marriage he had seven children: (1) Robert Hudson (born 18 February 1886, died 16 April 1971), married Lila Cochran (born 1897), daughter of William M. Cochran and Mary Dinkins Smith. (2) Ann (Annie) (1887-1982) married Thomas H. Hartley (1885-1926). (3) William (Bill) J. (1890-1964) married Gladys Grathon. (4) Hassell (1896-1966) married 1946 Mary Yates (born 1912). (5) Addie Mae (born 1899) married Mell J. Tanner (born 1887), both still living. (6) Tillman C. (born 1901) married Alma Carter. (7) Harold (Bubba) Psyon (1907-1973) married 1941 Mabel Mills.
 
Family: F2550
 
19 Six children. Family: F3074
 
20 The Worth County Cemetery book, p. 147, the Daniel Willis Family Cemetery, one book entry reads:
2 adult daus. of Daniel & Elizabeth Willis / no names/dates
(These would be the graves marked 14 and 15 on the cemetery diagram.) But all the known daughters of Daniel and Elizabeth have been located, including the unmarried Nancy and Mary, who died in adulthood and are buried in this cemetery and are listed in the cemetery book. 
Family: F467
 
21 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F859
 
22 Whiteside, Foster Clay, The Underwood-Whiteside Family of Rutherford County, North Carolina (1972):
-----There is some suspicion that the Whitesides may have already intermarried with the Underwoods in Ireland before they came to America. Therefore, John Whiteside Sr and his wife, Mary Underwood, may have been cousins of some degree. The Kellys that all three of their children married may have been brother and sisters. Losses of records in old Tryon and Rutherford Counties have so far stymied resolution of this relationship. 
Family: F1436
 
23 Arrived aboard the Seafloure (Seaflower) Jane
 
24 Lula's daughter Gertrude was born about 1907; Lula's husband was a widower by the 1910 Census. Lula
 
25 Her maiden name is unknown. John's obituary refers to her only as "Mrs Gannaway"; marriage records for her and John provide her first name. Rebecca
 
26 (She is named in her husband's will.) Susannah
 
27 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
28 From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM #672835:
-----Served in War of 1812.
-----He was living in Marion County, Mississippi, at time of 1820 census—males 1 of -10, 1 of 26-45; females 2 of 10-15, 1 of 16-26.
-----He was living in Yazoo County, Mississippi, in 1830 census - males[GEDCOM truncated here] 
Daniel Blue
 
29 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
30 From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM File 672835:
-----He was born in Cumberland County, North Carolina, and in 1774 moved to Richmond County, North Carolina, where he married his first wife, Mary McLaughlin, in 1783. He moved to Montgomery, Alabama, in ca1819 and he died there.
-----Due to all of the disturbance and troubles incident to the Revolutionary War between the Tories and the Whigs, Dugald chose not to marry during the conflict. About 1783, he married Mary McLaughlin, daughter of A. D. McLaughlin, and a native of North Knapdale, Argyleshire, Scotland. She had migrated with her family from Scotland in 1767. Eight children were born from this marriage.
-----In about 1810 Dugald entered a second marriage to Mary McLaurin, also a native of Scotland. There were 5 children by this marriage.
-----Regarding the Revolutionary War, a maternal uncle of Neil Blue is reported to have said that the McLaughlins and the Blues were the only Scottish families that fought on the side of the colonies in that war, but Neil Blue, fifth child of Dugald, is reported to have said that his father did not participate on either side in the Revolutionary War, as was the custom of many Scottish settlers who had been forced to sign an oath of Loyalty to the King of England as a requirement to migrate to the colonies.
-----In 1853, Neil Blue persuaded his youngest brother Malcolm to return to North Carolina and bring their father Dugald to Montgomery. The trip had to be made in a horse drawn gig, or buggy, because of the advanced age of Dugald. Dugald then lived in the home of Neil until his death on December 31, 1836, coincidentally, the anniversary of the death of his first wife, Mary McLaughlin. Dugald is buried in what is now known as Oakwook Cemetery in Montgomery, Alabama. Many of his children and grandchildren are buried in the same Blue Plot. The date of birth of Dugald antedates all others buried in that cemetary. 
Dougald Blue
 
31 From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM 672835:
-----He was a veteran of WWII , navy. He had no children. Date of birth could be in question--Bible shows 1920--obituary shows 1919. 
Herman Felton Blue
 
32 From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM 672835:
-----Neil Blue suffered a concussion and skull fracture in a fall from a horse in 1811 which prevented him from continuing his chosen profession of farming. He obtained more education and became a teacher. 
Neil Blue
 
33 From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM 672835:
Born in Excelsior, Louisiana, to Leslie Jane Blue (1884-1933) and Mary Hodges (1886-1971). His grandparents were Daniel Angus Blue (1849-abt 1912) and Sallie. His greatgrandparents were Neill Ray Blue (1822-1892) and Margaret Gillis (1828-1890). Although his parents were from North Carolina, his father was in the naval business and was at the time of his birth in Louisana. The family moved back to North Carolina and Rhodes was raised and schooled in the Dunn, North Carolina, area which was the home of his mother. While working in the Miami, Florida, area as a baseball player for the railroad he met Wyolene Ellis, who at the time was managing the Western Union in Hialeah, Florida. They were married in Miami and then moved to Ashburn, Turner County, Georgia which was the home of Wyolene. There Rhodes worked at the Rogers (which later became Colonial Stores) Grocery store. They had a child Leslie Lazelle born in February 1935 and died two days later. At that time they lived with the parents of Wyolene, Mr. and Mrs. John H. Ellis. In early 1936 Rhodes and Wyolene completed a new brick home on Rainey Street in Ashburn and in this house their second son, Wayne was born in November 1936. Other children: Donna Marie was born in 1941 and John Allen in 1952.

Rhodes and Wyolene were very active in community activities. They were very active members of the First Baptist Church of Ashburn, where Rhodes was a Deacon, Chairman of Deacon Board, Sunday School Teacher, Sunday School Superintendant. He was Clerk of the Church from late 1940s until the late 1970s.

Rhodes helped organize in 1936 and was the first scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 31. This troop had to be organized out of the National Headquarters of the BSA since there were not that many Boy Scout troops organized at that time. All his life he was active in the scouting program of not only Turner County, Georgia, but at the council level at Chehaw Council in Albany, Georgia. He served on Executive committe of the Council. In 1955 he was honored by being presented the Silver Beaver Award, a council's highest award.

Rhodes was also a devoted 32nd degree Mason and spent much of his time working with the Masons and the Shriners. In 1977 he was honored by the Hasan Temple of the Shrine by being elected its Potentate, which is the highest office at the temple level. Hasan Temple has the jurisdiction over most of south Georgia's shriners and clubs. He had numerous honors bestowed on him while in the Mason's and Shrine, however none of these effected his helping youth. As a member of the Turner County Shrine club he and several other members organized and built a recreation center in Ashburn which included a skating rink, swimming pool, ball park, picnic area and playgrounds. They made this available to the public, and especially the youth, at a very low cost. Rhodes and a few other shriners oversaw the operation of the facilities on a daily basis, always seeing that no child was turned away for lack of funds.

When World War II broke out Rhodes and family moved to Warner Robins, Georgia, and he became an engineer on Robins AF Base. In 1945 after the war was over the family returned to Ashburn and Rhodes and his father-in-law John Ellis opened an Economy Auto Store; the business was so successful that they later moved to a larger building and expanded their lines of merchandise. Mrs Blue was active in the business also and carried a gift department and some jewelry. They bought out a jewelry store in Ashburn and finally combined all these into one store. As the needs of the consumer changed, so did the type of merchandise sold and eventually the store became Blue's of Ashburn, Inc and was a department store that carried ladies clothing and jewelry and gifts. Now a complete jewelry store, Rhodes learned jewelry repair and became a jeweler. The store catered to brides and everything for a wedding.

At the time of Rhodes' death on Wednesday, May 13, 1981, the Hasan Temple sh [GEDCOM import terminates here.–KF] 
Rhodes Ellsworth Blue
 
34 Died in the Houston V.A. hospital. Talmadge Ferrell Blue
 
35 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
36 Source states his two children died unmarried, but does not identify the children's mother(s). George Washington Bogan
 
37 He volunteered for the Mexican-American War and died en route to Mexico. William Locklin Bogan
 
38 Johann and his eldest son, Nicholas, came from Germany and arrived in Philadelphia in 1741 aboard the MarlboroughJohann Diel Bohne
 
39

Pages 36-37: WILL of CATHERINE SULLIVAN. William Sullivan, Executor. Frederick, Maryland. Liber H.S. #3, folio 276. Made March 25, 1824. Filed May 17, 1824.
In the name of God Amen, I Catherine Sullivan of Frederick County in the state of Maryland being weak in body but of sound and disposing mind and memory and understanding calling to mind the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs before it shall please God to call me hence, I do therefore Make and publish this my last will and Testament in the manner and form following.
First and principally, I commit my soul into the Hand of Almighty God and my body to the earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my executor hereinafter named and after my debts and funeral charges are paid, I devise and bequeath as follows:
I give and bequeath unto my son Daniel Sullivan the debt due to me from the Estate of my son David Sullivan.
I give and bequeath unto my son William Sullivan one feather bed and bedstead with all the bedclothes thereunto belonging also three bed quilts, one cow and one table to the said William Sullivan his heirs and assigns.
I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Sullivan one feather bed, bedstead and all the bed clothes and furniture thereunto belonging, one cow (her choice of my stock) Tenplate stove and pipe, my large iron pot, frying pan, two pewter dishes and five pewter plates, cotton wheel and cards and all my crockery and tin ware, Half a dozen ten spoons (Silver) to her my daughter Mary her heirs and assigns.
I give and bequeath unto my daughter Margaret Bear my spinning wheel and large chest.
I give unto my son Michael Sullivan, one bed quilt.
I give and bequeath unto my daughters Margaret Bear and Mary Sullivan all my wearing apparel to be equally divided between them; all the remaining part of my estate not hereinbefore devised I give and bequeath unto my son William Sullivan and daughter Mary Sullivan to be equally divided between them share and share alike.
And lastly I hereby nominate constitute and appoint my son William Sullivan, executor of this my last will and testament Revoking and annulling all former wills by me heretofore made ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 25 day of March 1824.
CATHERINE SULLIVAN (SEAL)
Witnesses-William Durbin
Nicholas Durbin
On the 17th day of May 1824 came William Sullivan etc., etc.

Pages 36-37: WILL of CATHERINE SULLIVAN. William Sullivan, Executor. Frederick, Maryland. Liber H.S. #3, folio 276. Made March 25, 1824. Filed May 17, 1824.
In the name of God Amen, I Catherine Sullivan of Frederick County in the state of Maryland being weak in body but of sound and disposing mind and memory and understanding calling to mind the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs before it shall please God to call me hence, I do therefore Make and publish this my last will and Testament in the manner and form following.
First and principally, I commit my soul into the Hand of Almighty God and my body to the earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my executor hereinafter named and after my debts and funeral charges are paid, I devise and bequeath as follows:
I give and bequeath unto my son Daniel Sullivan the debt due to me from the Estate of my son David Sullivan.
I give and bequeath unto my son William Sullivan one feather bed and bedstead with all the bedclothes thereunto belonging also three bed quilts, one cow and one table to the said William Sullivan his heirs and assigns.
I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Sullivan one feather bed, bedstead and all the bed clothes and furniture thereunto belonging, one cow (her choice of my stock) Tenplate stove and pipe, my large iron pot, frying pan, two pewter dishes and five pewter plates, cotton wheel and cards and all my crockery and tin ware, Half a dozen ten spoons (Silver) to her my daughter Mary her heirs and assigns.
I give and bequeath unto my daughter Margaret Bear my spinning wheel and large chest.
I give unto my son Michael Sullivan, one bed quilt.
I give and bequeath unto my daughters Margaret Bear and Mary Sullivan all my wearing apparel to be equally divided between them; all the remaining part of my estate not hereinbefore devised I give and bequeath unto my son William Sullivan and daughter Mary Sullivan to be equally divided between them share and share alike.
And lastly I hereby nominate constitute and appoint my son William Sullivan, executor of this my last will and testament Revoking and annulling all former wills by me heretofore made ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 25 day of March 1824.
CATHERINE SULLIVAN (SEAL)
Witnesses-William Durbin
Nicholas Durbin
On the 17th day of May 1824 came William Sullivan etc., etc. 
Catherine Boone
 
40

Page 32: WILL of JOHN BOON. Christiansburg, Virginia. Made February 24, 1824. Filed March 1825.
In the name of God amen I John Boon of Montgomery county & state of Virginia being weak in body but of disposing mind & memory and being desirous to dispose of such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with,
FIRST: I desire that all my just debts be paid;
SECONDLY, I desire that all my estate both real and personal be sold by executors, and the money arising from such sale to be equally divided between my wife Elizabeth Boon, Mary Boon, Elizabeth Wedel, Catharine Jammerson, Abraham Boon, Sariah Harter, Nancy Flegar, Jacob Boon, my son having received his part in advance, therefore he is to have none of the rest of my estate, also my wife is to have her choice of my feather beds together with the furniture belong to it, extraordinary
LASTLY I appoint my son Jacob Boon and my son in law Andrew Weddle executors to this my last will and testament
In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 24th day of February 1824.
JOHN BOON (SEAL)
Signed and sealed in the presence of us
Moses Green Jr.
Isaac Nafe
At Montgomery March court 1825.
This last will and testament of John Boon deceased was proven in court by the oaths of Moses Green Jun and Isaac Nafe the witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded; and on the motion of Andrew Weddle one of the executors therein named who made oath thereto, and together with Thomas Goodson and Jonas Weddle his securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of Four thousand dollars conditioned as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate of the said will in due form, liberty being reserved to the other executor therein named to join in the probate at a future time.
Teste CHARLES TAYLOR C.
A Copy, Teste: (SGD) A. B. Corrin Clerk

Page 32: WILL of JOHN BOON. Christiansburg, Virginia. Made February 24, 1824. Filed March 1825.
In the name of God amen I John Boon of Montgomery county & state of Virginia being weak in body but of disposing mind & memory and being desirous to dispose of such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with,
FIRST: I desire that all my just debts be paid;
SECONDLY, I desire that all my estate both real and personal be sold by executors, and the money arising from such sale to be equally divided between my wife Elizabeth Boon, Mary Boon, Elizabeth Wedel, Catharine Jammerson, Abraham Boon, Sariah Harter, Nancy Flegar, Jacob Boon, my son having received his part in advance, therefore he is to have none of the rest of my estate, also my wife is to have her choice of my feather beds together with the furniture belong to it, extraordinary
LASTLY I appoint my son Jacob Boon and my son in law Andrew Weddle executors to this my last will and testament
In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 24th day of February 1824.
JOHN BOON (SEAL)
Signed and sealed in the presence of us
Moses Green Jr.
Isaac Nafe
At Montgomery March court 1825.
This last will and testament of John Boon deceased was proven in court by the oaths of Moses Green Jun and Isaac Nafe the witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded; and on the motion of Andrew Weddle one of the executors therein named who made oath thereto, and together with Thomas Goodson and Jonas Weddle his securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of Four thousand dollars conditioned as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate of the said will in due form, liberty being reserved to the other executor therein named to join in the probate at a future time.
Teste CHARLES TAYLOR C.
A Copy, Teste: (SGD) A. B. Corrin Clerk 
John Boone, Sr
 
41 Whedon, pages 3-3A: This Michael, son of Nicholas (pages 10, 11 & 14), and grandson of Johann Diel Bohne, was born about 1773 (his wife born in 1776, 1850 U.S. Census) and died by July 26, 1832 (Adm. Acct. in his estate, Liber G.M.E. #3, folio 13), married October 14, 1804 Mary Magdalena Burrier, daughter of Philip and Barbara Burrier. Philip Burrier died in 1803 leaving 207 acres called "Hitchbaugh" in the Mt. Pleasant district, about midway between Mt. Pleasant and Liberty, the buildings some 200 yards from the main highway on the east side of the road. Deeds filed between 1806 and 1810 show that Michael Boone (named son-in-law and executor in Barbara Burrier's will, filed in 1822-Liber H.S. #3, folio 2) bought this land from the Burrier heirs. Michael's widow, Magdalena, her daughter Esther Nusbaum and husband Frederick Nusbaum, deeded a part of it to Frederick C. Keller in 1846 (Liber #3, folio 364). Paul Etzler of Frederick is the present owner. He and his tenant both say no graves are there now.



Whedon, pages 3-3A: This Michael, son of Nicholas (pages 10, 11 & 14), and grandson of Johann Diel Bohne, was born about 1773 (his wife born in 1776, 1850 U.S. Census) and died by July 26, 1832 (Adm. Acct. in his estate, Liber G.M.E. #3, folio 13), married October 14, 1804 Mary Magdalena Burrier, daughter of Philip and Barbara Burrier. Philip Burrier died in 1803 leaving 207 acres called "Hitchbaugh" in the Mt. Pleasant district, about midway between Mt. Pleasant and Liberty, the buildings some 200 yards from the main highway on the east side of the road. Deeds filed between 1806 and 1810 show that Michael Boone (named son-in-law and executor in Barbara Burrier's will, filed in 1822-Liber H.S. #3, folio 2) bought this land from the Burrier heirs. Michael's widow, Magdalena, her daughter Esther Nusbaum and husband Frederick Nusbaum, deeded a part of it to Frederick C. Keller in 1846 (Liber #3, folio 364). Paul Etzler of Frederick is the present owner. He and his tenant both say no graves are there now. 
Michael Boone
 
42
The cemetery book says that Nancy's headstone gives a date of birth of 26 March 1848; another source gives 26 March 1842. The latter date may be more reasonable in light of her marriage in January 1859 and the birth of a short-lived son that same month. 
Nancy Branch
 
43
The cemetery book says that Nancy's headstone gives a date of birth of 26 March 1848; another source gives 26 March 1842. The latter date may be more reasonable in light of her marriage in January 1859 and the birth of a short-lived son that same month. 
Nancy Branch
 
44 ¶ Cincinnatus T. Brooks, head of household, male, married, white, age 33, born in Georgia, farmer, parents born in Georgia.
¶ Elizabeth Brooks, wife, female, married, white, age 40, born in Georgia, keeping house, parents born in Georgia.
¶ William Brooks, son, male, single, white, age 12, born in Georgia, student, parents born in Georgia.
¶ Manda Meler Brooks, daughter, female, single, white, age 8, born in South Carolina, parents born in Georgia.
 
Cincinnatus T. Brooks
 
45 Brooks, Middleton Sr-1850 Census, Jackson County, Georgia:
¶ Middleton Brooks Sr, age 93, male, farmer, $200, born in Virginia.









 
Middleton Brooks, Sr
 
46 ¶ Middleton Brook, age 53, male, farmer, $1,200 in real estate, $2,635 in personal property, born in Georgia.
¶ Sarah Brook, age 53, female, born in Georgia.
¶ Amanda Brook, age 32, female, born in Georgia.
¶ Fanny Brook, age 19, female, born in Georgia.
¶ Cordelia Brook, age 14, female, born in Georgia, in school.
¶ Jospine Brook, age 12, female, born in Georgia, in school.
¶ Sally Brook, age 9, female, born in Georgia, in school.
¶ John Brook, age 3, male, born in Georgia.
 
Middleton Brooks, Jr
 
47

Mrs R.C. Shirley. Funeral for Mrs R.C. Shirley, 36, of Kathy Circle, Powder Springs, will be held at 11 am Thursday in Couch's Riverside Chapel. Burial will be in Roseland Cemetery.
Mrs Shirley, the former Lucie Brookshire Bruce, died Monday from injuries suffered in an automobile accident.
Surviving are the widower; sons, DeWitte Bruce and Clyde Bruce, both of Powder Springs; daughters, Mrs John A. Walker of Mableton and Betty Bruce, Jean Bruce, Virginia Bruce and Dianne Bruce, all of Powder Springs; parents, Mr and Mrs John J. Brookshire of Mableton; sisters, Mrs Tommy Summers of Atlanta and Mrs Ruth Brown of Powder Springs, and brothers, John D. Brookshire and William Brookshire, both of Powder Springs, and Thomas Brookshire of Ashland, Kentucky.

SHIRLEY--Funeral services for Mrs R.C. (Lucie Bruce) Shirley will be held Thursday at 11 o'clock from Couch's Riverside Chapel. Rev. John F. Humphries will officiate. Remains are at the residence of Mr and Mrs John J. Brookshire, 4917 Sugar Valley Drive, Mableton, and will be placed in state in the chapel at 10 o'clock. Pallbearers meet there at 10:45. 
Virginia Lucille Brookshire
 
48
From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM 672835:
Went to business college in Albany, Georgia, and there she met Walter Harmon. 
Aileen Martha Bryant
 
49
From Wayne Blue's GEDCOM 672835:
Ezra worked for the Wrought Iron Range Company in Virginia and so did Harley Bryant and Wylie Bryant. The story goes that he had Irene and also Vera Beason pregnant at the same time. He did not marry Vera and her son was Guy Beason.
Ezra was a veteran of WWI along with brother Harley O. 
Ezra M. Bryant
 
50 Died in the V.A. Hospital, Atlanta. Harley Ober Bryant
 

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